Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Blinkered

Journalists, even the good ones, are perhaps one of the last groups one should seek the counsel of in the debate over media regulation. It's like asking a policeman about who should investigate wrongdoing in the law enforcement community.

Sunday, August 26, 2012

Estate of the Nation



If it hadn't been Grog's Gamut, it would have been someone else. The unmasking of the popular political blogger by The Australian newspaper in 2010 served in retrospect as the moment when blogging in Australia gained something of a critical mass.

Until then, the nation's mainstream media had treated blogs as background noise, at best, unrelated to the real business of journalism and political commentary. But when News Ltd's James Massola revealed "Grog's" true identity as a Canberra public servant Greg Jericho, it was clear something had changed.

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Springtime of the Peoples

For a group where lip-curling cynicism is the mask of choice, journalists sure seem to have gone all hand-on-heart, high-falutin'. It's impossible to read an editorial these days without being slapped around the face with warnings of the coming police state.

"Freedom" is on the chopping block, we are told, all because a government-commissioned inquiry recommended the establishment of an independent regulator to improve the accountability of media organisations to the public and to ensure they follow the very standards they claim to uphold.

Sunday, August 12, 2012

Groundhog News

News is what's new. At least that's the traditional definition. But in the case of a heavily concentrated Australian mainstream media, news is defined by the same half-dozen issues constantly rehashed as vehicles for faked-up conflict and partisan opinion mongering.

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

Typecast

 Cast your mind back 17 years. A Reuters journalist prepared a report on the jobs data. loaded his script on the autocue, turned on his TV lights, positioned the ISDN camera, loaded his DIY graphics and went live to air on a digital feed to Tokyo. Afterwards, he wrote 800 words for the wire, recorded and cut a radio interview and turned around a 2-minute package for conventional TV.

Yes, that 'multimedia' journalist was me, which is why I'm surprised to read that "everything has changed" in the last 10 years and an entire new skillset is now required of journalists. Writing quick updates for the web is a huge imposition, it seems, and a radical departure from what came before.